UK electric car adoption pace not quick enough to meet government targets: Study

UK electric car adoption pace not quick enough to meet government targets: Study

Electric car adoption pace in the UK is not quick enough to allow the government to meet its EV transition targets, a fresh analysis of stats from the Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders (SMMT) revealed. The UK government has set a target to totally ban sales of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030. According to the latest study and analysis of SMMT stats by online car marketplace Auto Trader, electric cars need to account for more than 10 per cent of new car registrations this year to achieve that target.

More precisely, SMMT figures show electric vehicles (EVs) make up just 8.4 per cent of new car sales thus far in 2021. To be on track to meet the government EV transition targets, the proportion would need to be at 11 per cent of the total new car sales, or roughly 30 per cent higher than where it stands now.

According to the new study, interest in electric cars is on the rise but the pace of adoption is not enough to allow the government to meet its EV transition targets. The zero-emission vehicles account for one in seven or 14.3 per cent of new car advert views, significantly up from 3.8 per cent from August last year. The research also indicated that nearly one in every five customers or 17.7 per cent of customers have plans to buy an electric car, up from 8.8 per cent in January and 11.8 per cent in May.

Commenting on the study’s findings, Plummer said, “We’re seeing more choice, and significantly more advertising and marketing spend from manufacturers promoting electric models, and as a result, we’re seeing more sales too. However, in the context of 2030, the market isn’t where it needs to be.”

By the end of current decade, the British government wants to end the sale of traditional petrol and diesel-powered cars. The gradual phase out of the traditional fossil fuel-based will make way for electric and hybrid cars. Under current proposals, hybrid cars will be phased out by the year of 2035, leaving only fully-electric and hydrogen-powered cars available in the UK automobile market.

Experts are of the view that the government can accelerate the pace of EV adoption by encouraging investment and providing more incentives in the form of tax rebates and subsidies on the purchase of new electric cars.

Business: 

Advertisements